Sweet Sixteen Apple Tree

Sweet Sixteen Apple Tree


The sweet sixteen apple tree is a common fruit tree species for both the landscaping and the fruit productivity in thousands of gardens. You can consider planting them along with other apple tree species in your garden if there are any. Although its ornamental value is not as important as its fruit productions, the attractive apple tree flowers can add extra beauty to your spring garden.


This apple tree prefers slightly acidic soil with well-drained conditions. You should avoid planting them in highly compact soil types like clay soil. To ensure the maximum productivity of fruits, you should plant them in an area with adequate full sunlight during the day. To facilitate the pollination, you’d better plant them with other apple tree species together. They can naturally resist some common apple tree diseases like apple scab and fireblight. However, you still need to pay attention to some diseases like powdery mildew which may infect the sweet sixteen trees. Some pests like aphids and plum curculio can also cause damages on the tree. So, you should apply some chemical pesticide frequently to lower the risk of getting infected.

The best way to propagate a sweet sixteen apple tree is via cutting instead of seeds. Currently, most commercial apple trees are using cuttings as the main way to replicate a tree to another place. You can pick up your favourite tree from your local nurseries. There are normally two types of rootstocks for apple trees, namely, dwarf and semi-dwarf ones. Compared with normal apple trees, the dwarf rootstock can produce fruit earlier and easy to manage as well.

Attribute
Image provided By Scott Bauer, USDA ARS [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

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