Japanese Fern Tree

Japanese Fern Tree


Native to Eastern Asian countries, Japanese fern tree got its name from the large leaves which are similar to fern trees. Biologically called Filicium decipiens, it has compound leaves which are composed several narrow leaflets. Each leaflet is about 5 inches in length and these leaflets make the tree leaves look like a real fern tree.


This tree gains its popularity for several reasons. The first reason is that the symmetric composition of its leaflets and leaves make it perfect in aesthetic values. Also, its large crown can generate a large area of shade for cooling purpose in hot summer. It can add extra green color to your garden while providing your family the cool shade. Once established, it needs very little maintenance and you don’t have to spend too much time on the pruning work. You just need to get rid of some extra branches in the lower position of the trunk. Doing this can create more space for you to putting some furniture under the tree to enjoy the cool shade in hot summer.

The fully grown trees can reach up to 35 feet in height and it can tolerate most coarse soil conditions. It can also tolerate drought environment once their roots have been fully established. It prefers to live in warm zones and it is not a fast-growing tree. You should avoid planting Japanese fern trees in a zone where there is potential frost hazards. They can produce tiny attractive white flowers and small fruits in summer. One word, it can be one of your options if you are planning to plant a shade tree in your backyard.

Attribute
Image provided By Photo (c)2006 Derek Ramsey (Ram-Man) [GFDL 1.2 (http://www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/fdl-1.2.html) or CC-BY-SA-2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons

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